Health

A Doctor’s Guide to Viagra – When and How to Use It Safely

Like any drug, Viagra has side effects. Some are mild and go away over time, but others can be severe. You should never take more than a prescribed dose or use the drug for longer than recommended by your doctor.

You should also tell your doctor about any medications you take, including vitamins and herbs. Some medications interact with Viagra and can cause dangerous side effects.

Dosage

Viagra 100mg Malaysia has been shown to help around four out of five men with erectile dysfunction get and keep an erection hard enough for sexual activity. It is typically used as needed for ED, but it’s important to take it exactly as prescribed to minimize side effects. Your doctor will prescribe a starting dosage of 50 mg for most patients, which may be increased or decreased depending on your unique health history. It’s also a good idea to talk to your doctor about any medications, vitamins, or supplements you are taking, as some can interfere with how well Viagra works.

The first thing you’ll need to know about Viagra is that it only works when you are sexually aroused. This arousal can come from things like having sexual thoughts, looking at images of sex, masturbating, or engaging in foreplay. Then, once you’re ready to have sex, you should take the medication. It takes about an hour for the drug to work, but it gradually clears out of your system over the next few hours.

It’s also important to know that Viagra has been known to cause a rare but serious condition called priapism, a painful and long-lasting erection of the penis that can lead to permanent damage if left untreated. If this happens, it’s a medical emergency and you should seek immediate treatment from a physician. Priapism can be prevented by being sure you’re sufficiently aroused before having sex and by taking a lower dosage of the drug, such as 25 mg.

Your age can also affect how well Viagra works for you, as older people may need a lower starting dose than younger patients. This is because the body clears the drug from the bloodstream more slowly as you age.

Finally, there are a few conditions that can’t be treated with Viagra, including a history of heart disease, high blood pressure, or heart surgery within the past 6 months. If you have these conditions, your doctor may not recommend that you use the drug or recommend another treatment for ED. Similarly, if you have a bleeding disorder or stomach ulcer, Viagra will likely make your condition worse.

Side effects

If you experience side effects while taking Viagra, talk to your doctor. Depending on your health history, your doctor may be able to recommend other treatments for your symptoms or prescribe a lower dose of Viagra. It’s important to keep your doctor informed about all the prescription and non-prescription medications you take, including vitamins and supplements. Certain products can interact with Viagra and cause dangerous side effects.

Some common Viagra side effects include headaches, flushing, dizziness, and indigestion. Headaches can usually be eased by lying down and resting. Indigestion can be relieved by eating food or taking over-the-counter antacids. Dizziness can be eased by lying down and then getting up slowly when the dizziness passes. It’s also important to drink plenty of fluids when taking Viagra.

In some cases, Viagra can raise blood pressure. This can be dangerous for people with low blood pressure, and your doctor should monitor your blood pressure while you are taking it. If you have low blood pressure, your doctor might recommend that you do not take Viagra or may suggest a different medication to treat erectile dysfunction.

Viagra can increase your risk of priapism (an erection that lasts more than 4 hours). If you have this condition, it’s important to tell your doctor before taking the drug. Blood cell problems, like sickle cell disease, can also increase your risk for priapism and may cause damage to the penis.

Using Viagra with nitrates (such as nitroglycerin) can cause a dangerous drop in blood pressure. If you have heart problems or a history of stroke, your doctor might not recommend that you use Viagra. Heart conditions include angina, heart attack, and aortic valve stenosis.

Using Viagra with some recreational drugs, such as cocaine, can increase the chance of side effects. This is because these drugs can slow the way your body breaks down Viagra. You should not take any recreational drugs while taking Viagra unless your doctor approves it. Your doctor should also know if you have liver or kidney problems, as these may affect your ability to break down and use Viagra.

Interactions

A little-known fact about Viagra is that it can interact with certain medications, including some blood pressure treatments. It can also affect how other drugs are processed by the body. This is why you should only take it as prescribed by a doctor who knows your medical history and can make sure you are getting the right dose for your unique health situation. It’s especially important to talk with your doctor before you start taking Viagra if you are already on medication for your heart or blood pressure.

Sildenafil (the drug that Viagra contains) is absorbed from the gut into the bloodstream, so it works best when taken on an empty stomach. It’s best to do this at least an hour before sexual activity. You should also avoid high-fat meals because they can interfere with how well sildenafil works.

Another thing to keep in mind is that Viagra only works if you are sexually aroused. This could mean having sexual thoughts, looking at sexual images, masturbating, or engaging in foreplay. It won’t help if you have low libido or other conditions that cause a lack of sexual desire. For these conditions, other treatments that target the condition will likely be needed to see results.

Viagra can also interact with nitrates, which are used to treat chest pain that’s related to heart problems. It’s not safe to take the two medications together, so you need to tell your doctor about any other medications you’re on.

You should also talk to your doctor about taking Viagra if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. It’s not known whether the drug passes into breast milk or would harm a baby, but it’s probably best to skip it if you are.

Studies have shown that Viagra is just as effective in older males* as it is in younger ones. However, some older men may have a higher risk of side effects, so your doctor may recommend starting you on a lower dosage to see how you react.

Warnings

As with all medications, Viagra isn’t right for everyone. It’s best used on a doctor’s orders to ensure you get the safest, most effective dose based on your health needs and history. It also helps to avoid recreational use and purchasing it from unlicensed sources like online sellers or dudes at the bar.

You should not take Viagra if you have certain heart problems, including a stroke, or blood vessel disease (such as high blood pressure, aortic valve stenosis, or a history of heart attack). It can also cause your blood pressure to drop too low, and this could be dangerous.

The medication may not work as well for you if you have liver or kidney problems, so your doctor might recommend starting with a lower dose. It can also be harmful to a woman who is pregnant or breastfeeding.

It’s important to follow the directions on the label, including how long you should wait between taking each dose and when you should start seeing results. If you’re not sure how long to wait, talk to your doctor or pharmacist for help. You should also avoid taking it more often or for longer than your doctor tells you to, even if it seems to work for you.

Another important thing to remember is to never take Viagra with nitrates or nitrites, which are found in some recreational drugs like poppers. These can interact with Viagra and can lead to a life-threatening condition called priapism, which is when your penis stays firm for longer than it should and can be painful.

While it’s rare for priapism to happen while taking Viagra, you should seek immediate medical attention if you experience chest pain or an erection that lasts more than 4 hours. You should also talk to your doctor if you have a headache that doesn’t go away after taking the pill. They can recommend a pain reliever that’s safe to take with the drug. They might recommend acetaminophen or ibuprofen. It’s also a good idea to keep a list of all the prescription and over-the-counter drugs, as well as any vitamins or supplements, that you take.

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